Monday, February 1, 2016

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization as an Enabling Technology for Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy


Smith, A.N. and J.R. Long, Dynamic Nuclear Polarization as an Enabling Technology for Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Analytical Chemistry, 2016. 88(1): p. 122-132.


(This article does not seem to have an abstract, so I'm just posting the first paragraph here)

Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (ssNMR) can yield unique and insightful information for complex systems; most notably structural and dynamical information can be obtained at atomic resolution.1−23 A particular strength of MAS ssNMR is it can be applied to heterogeneous systems, which are not amenable to study by other high-resolution experimental techniques due to sample characteristics. For example biomolecular assemblies, such as membrane proteins, are often not tractable for solubilization, a requisite for standard solution state NMR experiments, or crystallization, as needed for diffraction studies.1,24 Solid state materials with limited global order are often difficult to characterize by diffraction or other spectroscopic methods (e.g., UV− vis, IR, etc.), and information on reactive moieties, of particular interest for chemical and functional insight, can be difficult to differentiate from bulk signals.